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Paratyphoid fever (enteric fever)

Typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever

From: Hyacinthe Vincent, Typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever. London, 1917.

Paratyphoid fever or enteric fever, a form of blood poisoning, also became common during the war, particularly in the early years.  It manifested in patients as headache, abdominal pain, diarrhea, body aches in back, limbs, and joints, and shivering, and fevers lasting anywhere from one to eight weeks.  This was a less severe infection than true typhoid and had a lesser morbidity, though could still lead to death from pneumonia or toxemia.  Forces in the Mediterranean were peculiarly subject to this disease, far more so than in Europe.  Typhoid fever itself was relatively rare during the course of the war, due, in part, to inoculation efforts.  Arthur Hurst recorded over 20,000 cases of typhoid and paratyphoid fevers from 1914 to 1918, but just 1100 deaths, though it had caused a far higher mortality during the Boer War.

Paratyphoid fever (enteric fever)